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Sept. 6, 2022

Healthy Habits We Can Create to Support our Mental Health + Ways to Improve Self Talk with Sam Eaton


Sam Eaton is an author, speaker, and founder of Recklessly Alive, a suicide prevention organization sprinting toward a world with zero deaths by suicide. Sam has spoken at over one-hundred events throughout the U.S sharing his story of battling depression and suicidal thoughts.

Sam’s first book, Recklessly Alive: What My Suicide Attempt Taught Me About God and Living Life to the Fullest, was released in January 2021 and reached the top 100 best-selling books on Amazon. He has amassed more than 125,000 followers on Instagram and over 80,000 followers on TikTok under the handle @RecklesslyAlive. He currently resides in Minneapolis, MN where he enjoys collecting vinyl records, lifting moderately heavy weights, and trying every flavor of Oreos.

In this episode we talk about:
- Suicide Prevention Month (September)
-Healthy habits we can create to support our mental health
-Ways to improve self talk
-Sam's personal story with struggling with mental health
-Ideas for how we can better support friends and loved ones struggling with mental health

Connect with Sam here: https://www.recklesslyalive.com
Connect with Sam on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/recklesslyalive/
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National Suicide Prevention Lifeline:
Call or text 988 or call 1-800-273-8255 (TALK) 
https://suicidepreventionlifeline.org/
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Transcript

Sam Eaton:

And everyone has mental health. That's the other thing is you have to have mental illness. We're all working on our mental health, we all our emotions, ebb and flow. And that's okay. And let's talk about how to manage that and how to put those habits into place to figure it out to try to enjoy our lives while we can.

Melissa Bright:

Welcome to The Bright Side of Life, a podcast where people share their personal stories of struggles, pain and grief. But through all of that, they are still able to find the joys in life. Hello, everyone, and welcome to this week's episode of the bright side of life. I am your host, Melissa bright, I just want to add before we get started that there are topics in this episode that may act as a trigger for some people. And today, I have a guest that has already been on the show once but I wanted to bring him back for a very important month and topic. Today I am talking to Sam Eaton. Sam was on my show back in December of 2020, to share his story of attempting suicide, and what he did to start winning his life back, you can actually go check out that episode as it's linked in the description of the show notes. But today we are talking to Sam because September is Suicide Prevention Month. And we're going to be talking about healthy habits we can create to support our mental health, and also ways to improve self talk. Sam, welcome back to The Bright Side of Life. How are you today?

Sam Eaton:

So wonderful. Thanks for having me back.

Melissa Bright:

Yes, I'm so excited. You're only you're my second guest that I've ever had on the show twice. So you should feel special.

Sam Eaton:

So honored and congrats on cracking the top 100 on podcasts. Incredible.

Melissa Bright:

Thank you. Yes, it's a great feeling. It's a great feeling. So before we get into it, you literally from the time in December of 2020 of like, well, that was the interview, but I knew you before and followed you on social media. You had something like 7000 followers at that point. Maybe eight. Now you have 128,000 Just on Instagram, I don't even know how many you have on Tik Tok. But you've been up to so much. So what have you been up to these days?

Sam Eaton:

That's a great question. The truth is, most days I wake up and I have no clue what I'm doing. Ultimately, though, I when I attempted suicide, and through my I mean, coming up on 20 years of battling with mental health. Nobody would nobody talked about it. Especially growing up. Nobody talked about what depression feels like what suicidal thoughts feel like. And even now I feel like our suicide prevention messaging so much of it, honestly didn't help me at all. And that's something I hear from people constantly. And I, I haven't talked about this a lot, because I don't ever want to discourage someone from from suicide prevention from talking about suicide. Right? But from what I've noticed it especially coming up on suicide prevention month, you're gonna see the hotline posted 100 times, celebrities will post call this number, but there's no practical steps like literally it's all just don't kill yourself said of how we don't just tell me to stay but tell me how to stay and how to take my life back? What are the things I should be trying. And so over the last year and a half, I've really focused on that I've really focused on learning myself and kind of using myself as an experiment, that's what sets me apart is that I have battled this, I don't have a degree in mental health. I just have tried all this stuff on myself. So I really have switched all of my content to trying to be more talking about those things, the exercise that I do the self talk different little tricks, tips and tricks that I've learned along the way. And the response has been really, really positive.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah, I love that you said that you are an experiment yourself. Because I feel like that's the same for me. We only have our story in our experience that we can go off of. And for me, sometimes I'm like, maybe nobody would ever benefit from this story. But then somebody has to somebody else out there has lost both of their parents or somebody like you who has attempted suicide, and are just trying to figure out life and whatever it is. And it's so important. And you are one of the very few that I have talked to and I see talking about different things that are important like Okay, great that there's a number of great there's a number that you can text, but we need to go a step More than that, because, like you said, everybody knows the number or they can find it. But some people might not even know what this means, like, Why? Why am I having this? Why do I feel this way? This isn't. And they need more help than they're getting?

Sam Eaton:

Yeah, absolutely. I mean, our world has a massive authenticity crisis. So one in five people battle mental illness in their life, one in six will battle depression and sometimes incidental depression, which might just mean when you lose a parent, you might have a low period of six months to a year, and you might be able to pull yourself out of that a lot of people can they don't need to go to me. But a lot of people do need extra help. But that's one in six of us. One and, and I would bet 99% of those people have never posted about it. Right? never shared. When do you ever see someone posting, I'm having a low day, anything like that. It's so rare, we just project project project. And I hope that that's the conversation, we start to change, we start to be honest and open so that people like you and me feel like it's okay to be a work in progress. Yeah, there is no magic cure, where everyone has mental health, that's the other thing is you have to have mental illness. We're all working on our mental health, we all our emotions, ebb and flow. And that's okay. And let's talk about how to manage that and how to put those habits into place to figure it out, to try and be sure to try to enjoy our lives while we can. Yeah,

Melissa Bright:

I love that. So before we get on to talking about the habits, and everything like that, Sam has done like a lot in these. Well, all of his life, but he's literally, you're an author of one of the best selling books called recklessly alive. And you're also a motivational speaker and have done many, many speaking gigs. former teacher, former Yeah. For I mean, you you have done a lot of stuff. And you are really, really passionate about helping people with their mental health. And I just think it's amazing for everything that you are doing. So let's get into how habits can help with our mental health.

Sam Eaton:

Absolutely. So I recently heard this, this thought that I cannot get out of my head and that it's habits actually put your mind at ease. because it lets you know what's coming up in your day and what's coming up in your life. And it keeps your brain out of that fight or flight moment when you know what's coming when there's structure to your day. That's why your brain likes structure. So I mean, one of the most important habits I've ever adopted is I wake up and I go for a walk almost every day. In Minnesota when it's negative 30, I might just go to a treadmill. But I cannot tell you that just that simple habit has improved my life, maybe more than anything other than regularly exercising and lifting weights, getting up most days and moving my body, whatever it is about my body chemistry, I usually wake up and my brain is sad or anxious. And just moving listening to music listening to great podcasts, like your podcasts. It just does something for me. And I was so against it. Like I'm like whatever dumb I don't need to walk this old ladies do. But when I say like I'm the experiment like that, that truthfully is one of the most important ones. For me the exercise and the movement water. Those kinds of physical sleep, those kind of three physical habits maybe are more important than anything else that I do.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah, something that's so important. I feel like each listener could take something away from the sentence says plural that you just said, some people might have heard, okay, these are the things I could do to support my mental health. I can go for a walk, I can become physical, I can do whatever. The part that I heard, and the part that I feel is so important is in 2020 That's when I got super depressed and I was like what is wrong with me besides the world? Like what is personally going on with me what is wrong? And for a long time, I did not understand it. Then I finally realize I was no longer in a routine. We were just kind of flying by the seat of our pants. I was already working from home as a travel agent. Any structure that I had went straight out of the window. I wasn't waking up going to my desk and booking trips and calling clients. I stopped working out which was a big part of all of my 2019 and then I find I'm like oh, that's what the hell happened. And I had no structure for like six or seven months. So the point I'm trying to make is maybe, if there's a listener out there, thinking like, oh, I don't have any of these habits, I don't have any of these routines. Maybe that's what because sometimes you can wake up and just look around and be like, What am I going to do today? And that's when your mind starts ruminating. And you're so right, taking the action, whatever that is, can stop that.

Sam Eaton:

I think one of the hardest parts about being in jail, I mean, I'm 34 now. But I feel like we just kind of get in these ruts where we don't do things that make us feel alive. At the end of the day. It's like, you know, like, when I was teaching, I would get up at 6am, I would work till 5pm. In the winter, it's dark, I would maybe go to the gym. And then I would eat a kind of a boring dinner and watch TV. And I'm wondering why I'm sad. And I'm wondering why like, I'm not doing anything that that's making my life better or working towards anything. I think all of us whether you struggle with mental health or not, we kind of fall into these comfortable routines. But in that comfort, where we're unhappy, right, we don't like what we're doing. So my number one tip out of everything is do one thing every single day that you don't feel like doing and that's for everybody. Everybody has mental health. Because it feels so overwhelming when you don't have those habits in place. Like, right, how am I going to drink water and do this and so we fall into these traps of the New Year's resolution of like, Okay, tomorrow, I'm gonna wake up and everything's gonna be perfect. But you can also just pick one, right? It's like, right house is a total mess. Just do one thing every day, set a timer for 10 minutes, or clean one closet, build that momentum. That is maybe the most important thing about pulling yourself out of that. It's just one thing, build that momentum start those habits in a very small way.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah, I talk I think, however many episodes, I always say that all of this sounds great in theory, but if you don't take the action, and I have been very transparent over the past couple episodes that I've been in this weird space, and I've been struggling with my energy, and that's put me in a weird, like, when your physical is like sometimes compromised, that obviously can make you depressed, and then it's just like a downward spiral from there. So I have been trying to like, okay, what can I do to get myself out of this funk? And so far, my answer has been, you gotta get up, and you got to start taking action. And just, even if your brain is like, I don't want to freakin do this, you have to. And that's what I've been doing. That's exactly what I've been doing is doing. I don't want to say that I don't want to do it. It's just sometimes your brain is so powerful that even sometimes the things that you do enjoy, you don't want to do them.

Sam Eaton:

Absolutely. I mean, it's kind of like, it's a bit of a mind game. Like, right, you got to kind of just push through your brain, you can't believe everything you think. Just get yourself to the gym, you know, it's like, yes, of course you don't want to go just get there. And if you do something, it's better than nothing. And build, build those habits.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah. And you said you can't believe everything you think that is one of the biggest ones, because forever. I don't want to say forever. But like the past two years, I've been on this healing journey. And I was able to like, not listen to those thoughts of lack of self worth, and all this stuff that I was taught as a little girl and whatever. And then all of a sudden, this like past two months, I'm like, why can I not shut these thoughts down, like what is happening, trying to do all the tools. It's just been a very, very interesting thing. But it is a fact that every thought in our brain does not mean truth. I know you talk a lot about, you know, we so often ruminate on the past, or we worry about the future. And that's where I like I've told myself so many times yesterday, Melissa, I'm just going to literally think about where I am in this present moment right now mindfulness, like that's what I have to do to be able to get through whatever it is. Can you speak a little bit because I know you you like to talk about the brain and not believing everything you think and how that goes with inner critic. self talk? Yeah,

Sam Eaton:

I do love to talk about this only because I am my own worst enemy constantly. Like I feel like I've spent my whole life just beating myself up. Right. Finally a few years ago, I kind of hit this point. And I wrote about it in my book, but I was like, I cannot spend the next 30 years here. hitting myself. So there's a few things that go into that for me for self talk. Number one, ultimately, I do not beat myself up for things I can't control or can't change. So for example, my voice I always in high in high school, I was bullied a little bit because I had a higher voice, I cannot change that. So why would I let my brain attack me for that, or height or things like that I have no control over those things are off the table, like my brain down on things like that. Number two is you have to active actively fight back against those things. And it's, it's tiring, it's hard work. But you can do it. That's that's the piece is so many people. And I get these comments constantly on my social media, they talk in absolutes, and you got to shut those absolutes down, I will never be happy, I will never be in shape that will never must be nice. It's great for you. That will never be my life. You've already you've already told your brain. I'm not going to do it. It's not happening. I'm a failure. So then why why do you expect that you're not making progress in your life, when you've just accepted that this is never going to be true? So the practical way to fight that is to use the words yet or but so like when your brain you don't have to lie to yourself like, I'm a supermodel like, I'm smart enough to know that I'm not going to be walking a runway anytime soon. And I'm okay with that. So I'm not going to say that to myself. But I don't look the way I want to look yet right? Like, I don't, I can't, I don't have the muscles. But I lifted two times this week. So using that sort of framework. It's hard work, but it does. Your brain is malleable. And it believes what you tell it. So the more that you say that the more that those things start to get easier. And you don't wake up every day feeling stuck, and pointless.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah. I just talk to oh my gosh, why didn't Christina who Dr. Kristin Neff is I don't, okay, well, she's like the Pioneer researcher on self compassion. She has been doing research for like the last 20 years on self compassion. And I just interviewed her last week for a summit that I'm doing around like your best year of your life, or whatever and self care. And something that I needed to remember, because so much of this, we've heard 1000 times before, you guys have probably heard so much of what Sam's already saying. But sometimes we just need that simple reminder. And she said that you beating yourself up is never going to get you out of a bad mood or out of where you like, that is the most unproductive thing you could do. beating yourself up is not going to get you in a good mood, like or get you like, I don't know, if it's like the like trainer mentality of like, you can do a give me 10 more or what, but like you're being mean to yourself, it's like that, it's not going to work. So why why even do that? If I would say Sam, if you're just going to be mean to yourself, that's not going to work. And I know that is so much easier said than done. Because we are both like extremely critical about whatever it is that we have to be critical about. But being mean is you're not going to get anywhere. And so

Sam Eaton:

the practical ways to work on that is putting positive messages somewhere or creating a few things to read every day, or like writing down a few positive affirmations. Like that gets a little bit woowoo. For me, sometimes you can accomplish everything. But it's feeding your brain positive things and then choosing the people that you surround yourself, may maybe it's the most important part in this whole conversation, right? We've all heard, you're becoming like the five people you spend the most time with. So you have critical voices in your life. That does become internalized. And you have to fight back against that a little bit. And it maybe might lead to some uncomfortable conversations with a spouse or a friend. They need them to be more supportive. But truthfully, a lot of that changed when I joined CrossFit. This like insane if listeners don't know what it is this insane. I don't know like lift weights, throw things around your body hurts all the time. It's like two years of that. But what my self taught improved so much because they're small classes of 10 ish. And you have a coach who tells you every single day you can do this, do five more, keep going and over time now that I don't do CrossFit anymore. I still have their voices in my head saying this right, right or adjust your elbows. So what you decide to put into your head and the positive things that you put into your head, like listening to a podcast every day listening to positive things is also a really easy and practical way to work on that too.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah, it's huge and the bigger message is getting yourself to do that. cuz sometimes like, I'm gonna, I'm gonna admit it. Like, that's where I have been, I'm like, I look at my journal and I'm like, I don't want to reflect right now I've been I've been sad, I guess is the biggest word or really critical of myself. And I'm like, I don't want I don't want to look at the dark, dark holes right now of, of where I am. But then again, I do, because I'm trying to like place where this is coming from. And sometimes that can be scary of like, why am I feeling this way?

Sam Eaton:

Opening up that can? What's gonna pop out?

Melissa Bright:

Exactly, exactly. And sometimes I don't want to know. But something else I heard really important. The other day of somebody else that I was interviewing, is when we ask ourselves why? That just gives us another reason to hold on to a story that we don't need to hold on to. Like, just to make it simple. Why am I sad? Well, my mom and dad died. Okay, well, that is true. Or they abandoned me like, I'm sad because my parents abandoned me. But yet, that's not true. Like what it hope it makes you hold on to a story instead of saying, Well, what can I do to make this situation? What can I learn from this? What what do I do now? So on and so forth. And I am usually always asking myself why. And I'm like, maybe I need to not we know why, Melissa?

Sam Eaton:

It's like, when you're talking, I was thinking like, we also sometimes just need tough love to ourselves, right? It's like, sometimes love looks self love. And self compassion is I don't feel like doing this, but I need to write, I know, journaling will help me. And sometimes my brain doesn't want to do the things that will help. And so maybe that's an accountability partner. Yep, maybe maybe it's just a different way of journaling, maybe you're just going to type it in or speak it, maybe you speak it into your phone. Maybe it's just brainstorming how to tweak that habit. But if you have something that works, and you know, it's gonna work. Who is Why is it so complicated?

Melissa Bright:

I know, I know. You know, for me, one of the biggest things when I get sad, is social media really does mess with me. I'll start seeing all the successful people that I started getting in my head about like, what whatever I'm feeling insecure about, I will that is magnitude on social media 10 times more. And I'm like, I should be doing this i And I'm, I've told this 1000 times, like don't compare yourself to other people. It's the thief of joy. And it really frickin is it like sucks the joy out of you. But I like I won't be on social media a lot if I'm like in my certain moods, but then there's like, people like you and normally me that are like, you'd all you want to do is like help people. And I feel like your mission is so much so important. Because just your your story. Your story is so important. Because everybody can look at somebody and say, Well, yeah, that that's you. And it's like, not that we're not special. But it's like, I'm this person, I don't come from any kind of massive wealth or this or this to say like, Oh, I was able to just pull the strings or whatever. We just have normal stories that we want people to relate with to help them and say no, but this is me. Does that make sense? I'm not trying to minimize your story. I'm trying to say like, no, but we are the normal people trying to tell you it's okay.

Sam Eaton:

And I truly believe that that's what people need. They just need real stories of real people who are just in the thick of it, like, Brian, like, who are just, yeah, I'm a mental health creator. And I struggle with mental health. And that's okay, that doesn't make me a fraud. In fact, that makes me more relatable that makes me exactly more endearing, and and when I see someone who is vulnerable and true about their struggles, no matter what it is, eating disorder, addiction, any of those things that get in the way of us feeling fully and recklessly alive, I am drawn to them. I am pulled to them. I remember when you share about the grief of your losing your parents in your family, like I am drawn to you and I feel connection with you. And I feel more likely to be vulnerable myself. And that's what this world needs is all of us to to be strong enough to be like, yeah, right. Life's just rough sometimes. And we keep trying.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah, that's where I have been for so long. I just didn't realize it because I've that's how the podcast started happening. is because I've always been able to be vulnerable with people like I've never had this, like, I basically had nothing to brag about. I'm like, I don't come from money. I had my daughter when I was 16. I didn't graduate college. But there is something that I am deeply, deeply empathetic with people. And I am all about making people feel comfortable. I don't want them to feel alone or left out. And that literally was like my superpower. So if somebody was struggling with something, I immediately opened up and said, That's okay. Because I'm girl, I feel this way, or I've been here. And that immediately connected us, instead of me being like, I don't know what you're talking about. I don't experience that bullshit.

Sam Eaton:

Just cheer up. Just try harder, why? You have nothing to be sad about. But you are so good about it. And I'm curious, I have a question for you. Have you found through the podcast that that has helped your healing journey at all, being vulnerable, being open, have been using it for a purpose?

Melissa Bright:

Oh, 100%, I try to open up as much as I possibly can about situations. I mean, I've, I've opened up about like, my cannabis induced psychosis that I had one time and check myself into a hospital. You know, my house being messy, I've shared about like, the weight, like way i look like if I have weight issues or anything, I just try to be relatable to people, because this is the shit that people are struggling with daily, not just once in their life. And then it's over, you know, like, the grief of losing my mom. Yes, it was 10 years ago, but it can affect me daily in some capacity, you know. So it helps me also feel more like myself, and I've had people reach out to me and say, Thank you for opening up about this, because it gives me either a voice, it makes me feel normal. It doesn't make me feel so alone, whatever it is. And so that's why I won't I say it every time on social media, when I share a post, I will never stop sharing my vulnerabilities with people because there are people out there that won't share. Because they're scared. And I get it. We don't always need everybody to share stuff. But if my story can help you or make you feel less alone, and be like, Oh, God, thank God, I'm not the only one feeling that way. Then I feel I've done my job. And I'm happy about that.

Sam Eaton:

100% Me too. And that's why I asked a question. I wonder if it was true for you. Because that's another idea of a habit for anyone who's listening, finding a purpose for your pain using the struggle you've been through to help other people is so healing to me, I kind of talked about like, if there's a way you can reach back into your story and help someone who's where you were like, that's, that's my sole driver in what I do is, yeah, I'm reaching back to 23 year old Sam, who was planning to end his life, who had no support like this, nobody open and talking about it. And I'm trying to, I'm trying to lift up and help that Sam. And by posting to social media almost every day, it also forces me to reflect and learn about mental health. So if there's anybody out there who's thinking, I've kind of wanted to start creating, but who's going to care who's going to talk about it, it takes work. But truthfully, it's another habit of mine, that it helps me every day just as much as it helps other people.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah. And you're getting so much feedback that you need. I mean, you have gained so much knowledge in this community of like suicide prevention and wanting to help people. Some of the stuff that you said on our very first episode was like, I did not even consider that or think of that, you know, when you say that, you know, people think that people just want to want to die. And that's not what it is. People just want the pain to stop. They don't see a solution. They don't. And it's like these conversations need to be had so people understand. And you are getting so much feedback from your comments and learning. I mean, you post stuff all the time, that I'm just like, oh my gosh, this is so helpful for people to look at it in a different light and in a different way. You know, as you guys know, I mentioned in a couple of my episodes a few weeks back that I have been struggling with my energy for months now. I started looking for some ways to get back my energy because I am so busy during my days and I need the energy and focus to get everything I want to get done, actually done. And I'm sure you guys can totally relate to this. For the last three days, I started taking this little shot, it's called Magic mind in the morning along with my coffee. And let me tell you, it has been a game changer, not only for my energy, but for my focus as well. I feel way better in in the mornings. Now, in the mornings were such a struggle for me, as I told you guys on that episode, I feel better my mood is better thank God for that they have these adaptogens that helped me relax. Also, what's really cool is they have the lion's mane in the quarter set mushrooms and the shot. And this helps boost your clarity and focus, I have actually been able to finish my to do list in such a shorter amount of time that normally takes me all day, I've gotten so much more done in these last three days than normal, seeing how well it's worked for me, I really want to encourage you guys to try it out as well. If you're having trouble being at 100% Some days, because it has helped me out tremendously. I have a 20% off code to share with you guys. It's bright 20. To use it, you can go to magic mind.co/bright and just enter the code bright 20 at checkout, the best part is is they do have a money back guarantee. And if you get the subscription, it's 40% off my 40% off code only lasts 10 days. So be sure to order ASAP. The link is also going to be in the description of this episode.

Sam Eaton:

Super kind, thank you I try and I mean I miss to write it's like it's not like every post hits Great. i Yeah, what like anything else, you you just try and you figure it out, and you get better at it over time. I mean, I've been posting almost, I posted almost every day on Instagram for I don't know, almost three years, and to have that I had 7000 or less. So it's like you put in a lot of work. But I also grew and got to be a better person too. So it's right. It's both. But I think purpose is a huge part of this mental health conversation. And if you feel kind of lost or like maybe my life has no purpose, getting involved volunteering, there's tons of research about how that too can improve your, your mental health.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah, serving is one of the biggest, biggest ways. And so just like you were saying earlier, you know, turning your pain into a purpose. It doesn't have to be I saw something the other day, some and of course, like anything we say can always be turned around and people will say you don't need to turn your pain into a purpose. Okay? And it's like, Okay, you're right, you don't? What if that's if you feel that that's how you could best serve people. And mine I know is for me struggling with either losing my parents, my self worth issues, inner critic, if I know that I think that this can help somebody, then yes, I'm going to turn this into my purpose. But I say all this because when you feel like you can't help yourself at a moment, that is when you should say, What can I do to help somebody else, that could be the smallest thing, smiling at somebody at a grocery store that might look sad. The smallest act of kindness that is serving, it doesn't have to be, I'm going to go in on a 10 year mission to Cambodia. Right, and they make this small because it makes us it can make truthfully The biggest difference.

Sam Eaton:

And it does really feel good chemicals in our brain. Like in some level, it makes us feel good to help someone else. It also gives us perspective of what other people are going through that we're not the only one struggling, connect with us, right like a lot of mental illness, it feels we feel isolated, we feel disconnected. We feel more connected to people when we so yeah, so of course you don't have to turn your pain into purpose. But for me, I think our scars are our superpower, right? It's like what is hurt us the most is one of our best places to be able to help others. Now I did a ton of therapy. I've been working on trying to figure out how to tell this story for almost 10 years. So like it's not like it was like oh, and now. Now I have the ability to tell everyone about my worst days. It's been a long journey. But it's I think it's a part of this. It's a lot of times we don't talk about we just ignore focusing on other people and maybe thinking a little bit less of me and what's making me sad.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah. What do you feel like? Okay, so you're 34 Now just turned 34? Yeah, you're a Leo like me, right? I am. Yeah. What do you feel Oh, I'm gonna throw I don't have this question prepared. What do you feel is the biggest thing that you've learned about yourself in the last 10 years? Told you, I'm gonna throw you put you on the spot?

Sam Eaton:

It is. I mean, truthfully, it is that question that came to me as I was planning to take my own life, it's Have you really given life, everything you've got is Have you really gone for it and gone for the big things that you want to go for? You might not, it might not work out. So an example of this is when I was 25, I had never run a 5k. And I decided to run a marathon, which is a terrible decision, I did run a 5k. And then I ran a 10 mile race, and I spent a year building up to that. It was awful. It was four hours and 40 of the worst minutes of my life. It was so painful. I wanted to quit the whole time. I was in pain for weeks after. But there is something when you do something like that. When you decide to start something you go after something like that, and you do it. The mindset shift that that gave me of Sam, you can do really hard things you can if you try. And yes, it's a messy process. I missed runs whatever, I was never an athlete, myself talk through that whole thing was awful. My dad used to say you run like a girl, your sister's, the athlete, you're gonna get you're the smart one. And I had this awful picture of myself as I can't be athletic. That's all me. But I needed to prove to myself that I could do something big. And I just went for it. And the book was the same way. It was like it took me seven years to get that book published. I wrote three full versions of it. I don't give myself enough credit for how hard I had to fight to get that book. I'm like, Yeah, I published a book, whatever I should write book too. But it's like, truthfully, that is it's like, pick the things you want out of life. We don't have time to do everything. Pick a couple if you don't like the way you look. Okay, pick, pick something and then just try it. And yeah, maybe you fail, but at least you're failing in a spectacular way. And you're failing because you're in the fight and you're in the arena. And you are you're trying to make the life that you want. Because even like we said before, even if you get it, even if you build this multimillion dollar company, is not going to be the answer. Unless you are taking care of you and you are going for it.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah, that is what Okay, what did you get? You said what your biggest lesson was, I literally just forgot, oh, going like after things in life and like, have you given it your best shot? That is such like an aha moment because that's exactly what happened to me in 2020. When this like, I was a travel agent. Okay, it was, it was fine. And I enjoyed it. But that's not really what brought me joy. And once I finally realized, like, what I really enjoy is having these conversations with people that could potentially help other people. And I just went for it. I was so happy I did to see. And my life has changed a lot in in two years, you know, I get to talk to people, people email me to be on my podcasts like, that is something that I created that if I wouldn't have given myself a chance I'd be doing whatever it is, you know. And that's what you said is, maybe whatever you try does suck and you don't enjoy it or you're not good at it. But you can say that you one did it. And two, you now know and I'm sure as shit. guarantee you that you have learned something from it. Even if it's as simple as I learned that I actually don't like running.

Sam Eaton:

True. Not a fan.

Melissa Bright:

Didn't you just do a triathlon?

Sam Eaton:

Yeah. That was the first version of that

Melissa Bright:

amped up and out of that. Did you like that one,

Sam Eaton:

even on a bike when I signed up? First sprint, so it was a short it was a short it's it was about an hour and 45 minutes total. But yes, when I was fairly certain I was going to drown for about 10 of the 12 weeks I was getting ready for it. You had to swim 800 meters. So like a 20 minute swim or something for me. I was fair, I could not do 50 When I started. But guess what I did it and when it was done the boost of life that it gave me just spiraled in like rippled out into the rest of the rest of my life. And I yeah, I see that podcast being kind of some of that for you. It's like it was kind of the starting point and I'm sure it wasn't like massively successful right away. Sometimes you figure out but your trajectory from when you started is is incredible and we don't get enough credit for the things that we do. And I hope, I hope people listening. I believe everybody has something in their heart that they want to do I want to write a book. I want to do this. Just start, man, just open our document, just go for it.

Melissa Bright:

Yes. So have you heard of dharma? Do you know what Dharma is?

Sam Eaton:

I not very much. I know that word. Okay.

Melissa Bright:

Well, I might butcher it. But there's called I think it's the law of dharma. And the law of Dharma literally states that every person on this planet was put here for a purpose. Like, we've all heard of that, like, we're not here by accident, but they're literally like, that is a law, just like law of attraction law of reciprocity. We are all here for a purpose. And sometimes, like, that helps me when I'm like, why? I don't want to say why am I here? But sometimes I'm like, What is my purpose? What is this, sometimes it's just good to know, it's like, you are here for a reason to do something. It doesn't have to be this Bill Gates thing. You know, we don't have to be, whatever, whoever people like, I don't like Bill Gates, that's think of whoever you want to think of. Um, I lost my train of thought again. But sometimes I need to hear like facts like that to say, you are here for a reason. You can do amazing things. I don't know why I just lost myself my train of thought. But I did. Oh, something else I wanted to say because I was thinking when you were talking, it is so easy to like, look at you and be like, he's written a book. He has all these followers. He is constantly every day literally trying to help people stay alive and be happy and live the like most out of their life. I could literally feed you 1000 compliments and sincerely mean them right now. But why can't we do it to ourselves and or we don't believe the other person.

Sam Eaton:

Yeah, I mean, and to be completely vulnerable in the last week, I felt suicidal, I'm safe. I'm fine. Nothing's wrong. But just in the last week, I have felt like a failure. Like I'm not doing enough. Like. That's just part of my journey and my story. But we were saying earlier about social media, it is so easy to look at other people and think, look, they've got it, they've made it. And it's it's not it's not real life, life. And it's so hard to be that cheerleader for ourselves. But it's possible, right is 100% possible.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah. And I thank you for sharing that because some people, life is like ebbs and flows. And my podcast is called the bright side of life, I do wholeheartedly believe that. It is a journey to it. But I do not believe that once you get there that there's just going to be, in my case, all these sunflowers, just always, that is not the way life works. You can't have good without the bad light without the dark, so on and so forth. And so we might go into these these times. But something that I appreciate with you. Because there are people out there that do feel the same way as you and have been happy for the certain amount of time. And then all of a sudden, the darkness comes again. And it's like, Is this ever going to stop? And I'm sure you've asked yourself, Am I ever going to be happy? When are these thoughts going to stop? I think it's important that people know that this can happen again, thoughts can happen again. You literally say all the time you have to fight. And you I know you do fight to with to keep healthy with your mental health. You know, because you are here for a purpose.

Sam Eaton:

Yes, all of the Yes, Melissa. Yes to everything that we're talking about today.

Melissa Bright:

I don't even I feel like I don't ever, like ask you questions. I just make a statement. And I'm like, oh, and comment back to that.

Sam Eaton:

But like it's I love your style of podcasts because it's it's so easy to have a conversation and it just feels like friends over coffee, which is basically what this is. I just only have water because

Melissa Bright:

I know me too. I've already had my coffee. If I have any more my heart's gonna jump out of my frickin throat because anxiety Oh my god. But yeah, I just appreciate your vulnerability and that's what I want people to know. I know you've talked about people you've had you've had criticism, whether it's friends, family or just freakin social media. Yeah, haters being like, you preach this, this this, but then you're you, you're struggling like how is that possible? And it's like, Have you ever lived life? Because it's not always frickin rainbows and butterflies, okay. And that's the biggest thing I want people to know is, I would hate for somebody to look at me and just see like, Melissa, oh, she's done so good. She's this, she's that and she just doesn't struggle anymore. And then she feels they feel totally detached from the whole freakin point of my podcast and my story. I want people to know that I still struggle to this day with things. And I've went in ebbs and flows. I've been on freakin CLOUD NINE, where I literally thought I was invincible in terms of my mental health ever being. Like, being my worst self critic. No, now I have been struggling with this for two months. And I'm like, Where the heck come from. We're just being real people.

Sam Eaton:

100% 100%. And that's okay. And that's what we need. And that's okay. And this conversation is just so important. It's so important. That compassion, being a work in progress, not expecting yourself or other people to be perfect. And this idea that the bright side of life or recklessly alive, like, it's not this eternal state of happiness, you know, it's not nirvana. I don't that I don't think that exists. It's describing, you know, for me, the recklessly alive life, it's not, oh, I've achieved it, and I'm there forever, it's making choices to be more alive, or in your case, your brand, it's making choices to to look at the bright side and trying to be more positive, when you don't feel like it. And it's getting into that battle. It's not a place of arrival. It's a process that we're all working on, and trying to just be who we are in that.

Melissa Bright:

And that process. So so, so very true. Okay, so we've, we've talked about some habits, we've talked about self talk, I know that this is personally such an important month for you. Suicide Prevention Month, before we do your big reveal of something that you've been working on. What else do you want people to know about? suicide or suicide prevention? With your message? Yeah.

Sam Eaton:

So I kind of struggle with Suicide Prevention Month, and other people have commented on things that I've posted about some of my struggles. So like, I guess it's good that we have a month that we highlight it and that people are more open. In some ways, it kind of feels like when companies change their logo for pride. And then July 1, they change it back. But they haven't actually taken action to help a certain community, or that's just an example. But I feel like suicide prevention is, is kind of like that, like, it's become something that some people just pay lip service to, without providing solutions. Yeah, and part of that is, I think a lot of in my experience, a lot of suicide prevention is run by people who've lost someone versus someone who's experienced it. So I think anything you can do a to, to highlight stories, I hope that's my hope as we start spreading more and more stories of who felt this way, especially to our young people, suicide is the second leading cause of death for young people ages 10 to 24. The Attorney General declared Youth Mental Health a national emergency, like if you think about everything we've heard in the news, I've heard I think I've heard about youth mental health one time, and it's on the level of a national emergency. So it to me it's an I feel this way about basically every issue, our our culture tends to just post about it on social media and think that we're doing something. And I would challenge all of us to take an action action to get involved. Whether that is volunteering for an organization learning more, and maybe suicide prevention isn't what you feel like your calling is maybe it's sex trafficking, but just posting an article, please, please, please get on an email list for an organization. Find a way to do something that's moving, moving the needle, and not just not just talking about it and talking about it is important. It is so important. Please talk about it. That helps everyone and and please, please do something, you know.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah. That's why I feel comfortable with you because you, you've been in this x experience you've been in this situation, you know what it's like? I have not experienced that. So as much as it's near and dear to my heart, because of people that I know that I've lost and people that I know that have attempted. I almost feel like I, I'm not an expert. So I don't know what to say like you. You said, like, if sex trafficking is your thing, I'm like, I just want to bring on somebody. And yes, Sam, you are an expert, because you have you have lived this experience you you continue to, you know, fight every day and try to take care of your mental health. And I just think that's so important. But sometimes I'm like, what more? What more can I do to understand to learn to make a difference than than just saying, you know, my thing I struggle with in terms of helping other people is saying, I just want you to know, you're not alone. Okay, well, really? How much does that help somebody because I had a thought the other day of, well, I might not be alone in my house, like physically, but I'm alone with my thoughts. And that fucking sucks. Like, that's what people are struggling with. And then I like don't want to say them out loud. And so I'm like, what more can I do to help people not feel alone? So I say all of this, because we do need to open up a conversation in people like you to, to be like, what more what more solutions can there be, than just posting a hotline or having a month without, you know, and I think you're doing so good getting in the trenches. And being like, I experienced this and this, what we're doing now was not helpful.

Sam Eaton:

It was, you've already said in this podcast is what I hear over and over the most important thing and helpful thing you can do something for someone who's suicidal is listen without judgment, provide empathy. Don't try to fix it, just talk about wow, I understand why you're struggling so much. Thank you so much for telling me that, and just listening. And me too, when I am at my lowest one of the greatest gifts you can give is just sit with me. Invite me to just watch a movie with you do one practical thing and someone we don't we don't always know when someone's suicidal. And but a lot of this is just being a good friend. It's just being a good human and, and being there for other people, especially people who don't know how to ask for help. They don't know how to open that conversation. So they analyzed, I don't know, like 30 million texts from the suicide text line. And the the most important or the thing that works the best was just an expression of care. So saying something like, Hey, I know you've been going through a really tough breakup. Sometimes when people are in that space, they might have some scary thoughts, or they might have thoughts of dying. Have you felt that way at all? That in it, there's a little bit of a heart palpitation when you open up that conversation, but at the end of the day talking about suicide doesn't make it any more likely that someone will attempt. So if we really want to change this conversation and really lower the suicide rate, it starts with just being aware of the people around us and our co workers, our neighbors, being more inclusive of people inviting them to our community, inviting them to a bonfire. You don't have to be everybody's best friend. But listening, helping and just just generally being there for people is that kind of action that I'm talking about? It's not starting a nonprofit, it is just supporting people. I imagine grief would be a similar similar thing. Yeah.

Melissa Bright:

It's all I feel like about asking people, you know, even this weekend, we hung out with some friends and she knows we hang out with them a lot. And she knows I've kind of been struggling with like self worth issues, and so on and so forth. And she just asked me she's like, so how have How have you been doing? That right there? Opened up, she was very genuine and sincere. I don't feel like I know. It wasn't just a like, how are you doing? I don't really care. But I'm just going to ask that. And that was able to open up the dialogue in the conversation. And that is so important. And if you notice, or know that something has happened for sure, like a breakup or whatever it is reaching out and saying, you know, how are you doing? And whatever it is. It's so important because some people don't know how to ask For that help, and then if you throw them a lifeline, literally and pay attention to them, and oh my gosh, this person asked me how I was how I was feeling it, it could change, it could literally save a life, you know.

Sam Eaton:

And I would challenge posting and telling people, you're never alone, I'm always here for you is totally an okay thing. Don't ever feel guilty about that. And then I would just challenge people listening ticket one small step further. I know your brain has has had a lot on your mind. Would you like to go to a movie and get your mind off it? Or, you know, providing those tangible? Hey, is there any way I could pick up groceries for you, or, or just those little offers? That's one step farther, that takes one one action away from them, right? It's like when we talk about being at our lowest, and we don't have any motivation to do anything. Anything you can do to lower that barrier to be with that. Hey, can I pick you up and take you to target? Like, maybe like, No, I'm okay, thank you so much. But just taking it one step further than I'm here for you. And showing that a little bit more than than just saying it.

Melissa Bright:

That is so true. There there is somebody that I recently know, that is really struggling with depression. And so last week, they said something to me, they you know, they said, I'm really, really struggling with today. But you say some prayers for me. And I'm like, Yeah, I'll say a prayer for you. And then I'm like, but I'm gonna come see you, too. And I did. And I asked him, I said, you know, is there anything you want to do while I'm there? Because, just like you said, sometimes, like, offering ideas, because I'm very much like, I don't want to like maybe see people I like shut down more. So maybe offering like them the option of like, hey, what do you want to do? What is something that might bring you joy? Or is my company enough? Like, does that make and I do believe this person was just happy that I was there. And to talk to them, you know, but offering whatever, like, hey, what? Either you offer options or give them the option. And I don't think that oh, that was just the cure to depression. But you know, it was another day that that person didn't have to be by themselves, and they got some company and was able to talk and so on and so forth.

Sam Eaton:

And it might be that spark that just lifts them a little bit up. I mean, one will practice. One other practical idea I did is I had a friend who like that was like, I just want to be my myself. And so I just texted them a $20 DoorDash gift card and I was like, Hey, make sure you're eating, you know, get here's for a meal whenever you need it. And I tend to do that for new parents and things like that means to just do a simple or maybe you drop it off. Who knows. But one step further is what I hear constantly from people who struggle with suicidal thoughts is I need you to show to show up a little bit. And, and we can all that's all within reach for all

Melissa Bright:

right. Yeah, absolutely. Thank you for sharing that. Because I feel like people do need tangible steps. Maybe they say I want to help but I don't know what to do. You know, like, I thought I was maybe just like, you know, if I post something, maybe that's good enough. But maybe other people are like, No, I would totally help more. I'm just not sure what that looks like. Because yeah, it can't like we we don't know, like, sometimes we're scared. You know? I think mine is definitely like scared. Like, I want to be able to help so badly. But I don't know how please tell me how I can help you. You know?

Sam Eaton:

Sometimes it's just trying, right? It's just trial and error. You know, you send that gift card and they're they don't animal who wouldn't like that gift card, but maybe not. And then you're like, cool. I just a easy way for me to say I love you. I'm thinking about you. Yeah, exactly.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah. Okay, Sam, you have a huge announcement. Something that has been well, I'll let you say everything but Sam is announcing something here that is coming out. And why don't you take it away? Sam, tell us what's going on in your world.

Sam Eaton:

So on Saturday, September 10, which is National Suicide Prevention Day, funny that we're talking about this, but this is my tangible step. This is I spent the last eight months creating a mental health journal and planner because I so similar to you. So my book came out in January, January of 2021, the end of 2020 and I will was crashing in my mental health, I was the lowest I'd been in a long time, I was a teacher, they shoved us back into the schools full time, I didn't feel safe. I was also they made us they had us teach online. It was the most stressful time of my whole life, the world shut down again. So my gym is shut down, I can't use the tools that I've had. And I was I was a mess. I mean, and it was truly it was one really good friend who stuck with me through it, who was doing some of these practical things to help me get through it. But in that I developed these daily questions that helped me, kind of by accident, by trial and error, I was trying to journal a little bit each day. And it was a series of five questions that helped me pull myself out of it. And so I wanted to create something to give that to other people. It's, it might not work for you, it might not work for others. And then we started researching and thinking more broadly about okay, what are all of the things that go into that mental health? What are the things that contribute? And so my like, I'm just gonna make a journal with a few questions and wind pages turned into this massive 360 page 10 week, planner journal, self care adventure goals. thing, which I am so proud of. And honestly, I'm so excited just to use myself. So if people are watching on video, this is the proofing copy. Gosh, and not just the book. But yes, so the beginning starts with three big sections to plan your goals. So plan, pick three big goals for 10 weeks, and it's got a planner and a calendar. It's got a ton of self care ideas. self care is really important for mental health, and kind of different types of self care, and a spot to kind of like reflect and figure out, Okay, what does work for me to care for myself and be my best self. And then it's got a spot to plan adventures, a big part of like what I'm talking about with the marathon or like traveling, like we want to do these things. So it's got kind of those bucket list ideas and starting to think and open up our brains. You know, I've always wanted to take a sign language class, my parents, my grandparents were deaf, I didn't know them very well, I've never done that, that's on my bucket list. And that's easy thing that I could do to get me out of that, that right out of that thing. That's, that's the whole first section. And then it's 10 weeks of, it's got an excerpt from the book, it's got a habit tracker. So like, as you and I are talking about, like, Okay, I'm trying to drink water. And maybe you just have a couple habits, or I'm trying to walk every day. So you can track what you're doing each week, it's got those daily checking questions that I was talking about a spot to kind of keep some notes, it's more, that's kind of the self talk, that's where I reflect, it's got a schedule. So like we talked about keeping a schedule, making that structure, Planning Day, kind of reflecting on, these are my priorities, these are my goals, pulling them through your day. Then it's got what essentially is like a post it note, like I for those of you who don't know, my Instagram every other day, I just post an inspirational message. So I've taken those and put them in here. And then a page to journal so one full page to write about with with reflection question if you want to use it. So like this one is what is one thing I'm looking forward to. And it's, again, they're all questions that are designed to pull your brain, get your mind, stop stressing out about the past or future everything just pull yourself into kind of better mental health, and then it has a weekly reflection. And then it starts over. And it's 10 weeks of that. I can't even tell you how many hours I have spent in Canva and design and like I I've made a lot of mistakes the last eight months trying to get this out. But so it's 344 pages. There's a color version and a black and white version that's coming out the black and white version is a little more affordable. For those where income is a constraint. And it comes out September 10 National Suicide Prevention Day so

Melissa Bright:

oh my gosh, that seriously looks so amazing. You're like you don't even know you should be so proud of yourself Sam. You really seriously should.

Sam Eaton:

Thank you i I'm almost there. I think maybe maybe once it's fine I still have work to do this week maybe when it's finally perfect and out and I I am really happy that I took action. You know I did something I'm putting something out and yeah, maybe only five people will buy it maybe it'll get 100 Negative reviews and that's okay. It's I tried something I'm working on something to help other people and and I think I think it's going to do I think it's gonna be a game changer for some people.

Melissa Bright:

I think it's going to be awesome. I think it's going to help people. So question just working through this. Is there a link that people could? Could I could put in the episode now or do we need to wait because this episode is out today? September 6, if you're listening to it?

Sam Eaton:

If not, we can. The best option would be to follow me on social media at recklessly alive on Instagram Tik Tok or recklessly live.com I have an email list and I will communicate all those links once they are out.

Melissa Bright:

Perfect. So you guys heard that go follow Sam. Because his content is amazing. Follow Sam though. I don't even know if I follow you on Tik Tok. I might I'm not sure if

Sam Eaton:

it's i i don't get Tik Tok. I'm trying.

Melissa Bright:

That's what I was about to say I do. But I'm like, I've been on Instagram forever. Like, kinda. But seriously, your content is so good. And it like it's getting. I want to say it's getting better. But like, I love your little like, things you put in there, like little emojis. Or you'll always be like, some side note. Like what's up with this hair or like awkward high five. And it really does help with, like videos to like, break the brain up and being like, what? What just happened?

Sam Eaton:

The video today that comes out this afternoon that I'm gonna publish after this is like, who decided men need to wear short shorts again? Oh, trying to be my that's me. I would say that to you in person. So I guess.

Melissa Bright:

Exactly, exactly. Oh my gosh, that is so hilarious. Um, what have we left anything else out that you want people to know about you about the work you're doing?

Sam Eaton:

Of course, the best way to get to know me and my work is to read my book. Go back and listen to that first episode that Melissa and I recorded the book is the story of my suicide attempt it my attempt happens in the middle. And then the second half of the book is everything that's kind of happened since it has been in a top 200 best selling books even cracked the top 100 I think book number 67. In June, there was a day when it was the 67th best selling book out of all of Amazon which Hell yeah, it blows me away. I don't do I don't talk about it nearly enough. It's a short quick read. But I'm I'm really, really proud of it's a story. You know, it's the story and you have someone in your life or you or you yourself are struggling. Overwhelming the reviews have said how people identify and appreciate the humor and the just the little nuggets that I worked. Yeah, just a quick seven years.

Melissa Bright:

Oh, man, yeah. I have not read your book yet. I frickin have it, you send it to me, and I need to read it. I'm gonna read it. I'm literally I'm going to Montana. Well, when you hear this episode, when you guys hear this episode, I'm going to Montana in two days. But for you. I'm going on September 8, I'm going to read it on the plane. Thank you. Yeah,

Sam Eaton:

I want to I need to read it in one or two days. It's it's short on purpose. Because especially if people are struggling, I want you all to get through it and get through

Melissa Bright:

that. Exactly. Awesome. And you guys can also find that on his website and socials and all that fun stuff. Okay, so nothing has changed since you've been here last. I still ask all of my guests this. And just because you've been here one time doesn't mean I'm not going to ask you again. Because we're going on almost two years since you've been on my last episode. So Sam, in your own words, now what does the bright side of life mean to you?

Sam Eaton:

And I wonder my that my answer is a little different this time and what has been on my heart so much lately is how much I hate the word good vibes only. Like we have started to see this everywhere in neon signs. And it leans into this toxic positivity that we need to be positive all of the time. And you I worked for a boss who was like you cannot share a problem unless you have a solution. And it was this culture of you can't ever share how you really are how you really are experiencing this workplace. Everything has to be positive all the time. Positive, positive and that's not a real life. Like I wish all the signs had real vibes only because when I read good vibes only, it says to me, don't come hang out with me if you're not in 100 are set a great place, if you're not happy if you're not vibing you're not welcome here. And that is the opposite of suicide prevention that is encouraging people to isolate to stay away. I don't I don't want you around if you're gonna bring that now, I'm not saying surround yourself with negative people and I and people in my life I am. They get annoyed with me because I constantly I don't let them talk like that around me. I'm constantly encouraging them to try and be more positive to use the yet and the but as we talked about before to help their self talk, however, everyone in your life needs to know that you when you are having months, like Melissa is having you're having a week like I'm having you are 100% Welcome. You don't have to change who you are to be around me. You I see you struggling and trying to get on the bright side of life. And I'm I'm going to help you. I'm gonna welcome you with open arms as you try to hold on to that. And I'm not going to hold you to a standard where you need to be that 24/7 365

Melissa Bright:

Oh my gosh, that's such a great point. See, you say stuff. I almost just threw out my shoulder by the way, it just popped on me. Um, but it's stuff to just like, consider real vibes only. I love that. I love that.

Sam Eaton:

So call back to.

Melissa Bright:

Yeah, there you go. There you go. I wrote it down. I'll send it to you. So

Sam Eaton:

you don't forget it.

Melissa Bright:

All right, Sam. It was such a pleasure talking to you day. As always, you were awesome. And you should be so proud of yourself and your freaking journal is going to do awesome. It's going to be so great.

Sam Eaton:

Thank you so much. Thank you for just the incredible work you're doing. I'm so proud of you. And so proud of what you put out into the world the authenticity, it's just pure joy to know you, Melissa.

Melissa Bright:

Ah, you too. Thank you. Thank you guys for listening to this episode of The Bright Side of Life. This is such an important episode and such an important topic that needs to be continued to be talked about and the conversation needs to keep happening. And Sam gave such great tips on around mental health and negative self talk and ways that we can help our friends and our loved ones that are truly in need of more support. So I hope this gave you guys some ideas of you know if you want to be get involved or if you just know somebody that is struggling with their mental health. This is the way since this is Suicide Prevention Month. The information is going to be in this episode, as well as if you would like to can't contact Sam his information is there as well. I just want to help anyone and let anyone know if they are struggling, that there are options that you can seek help, and we want to help you. So please, if you know of anyone that may need to hear Sam's story, or hear this episode. Please do not hesitate to share this episode. Because we never know if this is the one that puts hope back in their heart.

Sam Eaton Profile Photo

Sam Eaton

Author, Speaker & Mental Health Creator

Sam Eaton is an author, speaker, and founder of Recklessly Alive, a suicide prevention organization sprinting toward a world with zero deaths by suicide. Sam has spoken at over one-hundred events throughout the U.S sharing his story of battling depression and suicidal thoughts.

Sam’s first book, Recklessly Alive: What My Suicide Attempt Taught Me About God and Living Life to the Fullest, was released in January 2021 and reached the top 100 best-selling books on Amazon. He has amassed more than 125,000 followers on Instagram and over 80,000 followers on Tik Tok under the handle @RecklesslyAlive. He currently resides in Minneapolis, MN where he enjoys collecting vinyl records, lifting moderately heavy weights, and trying every flavor of Oreos.